Who's Online

We have 1442 guests online

Live Traffic Feed

Life in the Skies

'A Local Bestseller!'

What Tony says
(See here)
and Book Launch video here
 
What others say

Les Posen
(See
here)

Yvonne Lee
(See
here)

Louisa Lim & Allan Koay
(See
here)

Aireen Omar, Asran & Bo Lingam
(See
here)

38 Readers' Comments
(See here)

Get an autographed copy here

AMAZON.COM  -  To Order, please Click here 

(eBook) Kindle edition - please Click here

Latest Comment

What are the eyesigh
Captain, I am in class 11 in India and want to bec

What are the eyesigh
PLEASE stop asking about your eyes!!! Read the art

Vomiting on long hau
I have traveled a lot (almost 2 million miles) the

Can you become an ai
Hi captain , I had an accident 15 yrs ago and ha

Does a jet aircraft
Reading through the comments was both entertaining

Does a jet aircraft
So many nonsense here... Earth isn't flat. Period.

What are the cruisin
"how in the hell can you reach JFK if you leave fr

What are the eyesigh
tjsoihsdojfsioufs f post

What are the procedu
Hello Sir, I am currently B737NG Cpt.TRI /TRE hol

Could an A320 pilot
I plan to do ATR 72 -600 type rating , for that be

Paperback Version

 For Local Availability - Check Here
 
Home > Air Turbulence > How much turbulence can a plane take before it breaks apart?
How much turbulence can a plane take before it breaks apart?
Weather - Air Turbulence
Friday, 18 December 2009 08:55

Dear Captain Lim,

I came across your site purely by chance and wow, it is fantastic. Well done Sir!

I fly three to four times a year and have experienced various levels of turbulence but nothing major (from what I've been told).

How much turbulence can a plane take before it becomes dangerous to the structure? How much, for example, can the tip of the wing travel vertically before being overstressed?

Is there a measurement used in the industry to grade the turbulence intensity?

I look forward to your answers and once again thank you for your excellent site

Best Regards

Costa

Hi Costa,

I have covered your queries many times in my site before. Just to refresh, below are some YouTube videos showing how much stresses the wings of the Boeing 777 and the Airbus A380 can take before they break apart.

Well, the airline industry ensures that before a plane is certified for passenger carrying, it must pass the stress test. For instance, at the planning and development stage of the Boeing 777, the wings were thoroughly tested to see if it could survive the strongest force that turbulence and bad handling could produce in the air or when landing. During the test, the engineers wanted to see if the plane could take up to 150 percent of the strongest force that it could meet in flight before it broke up. They stressed the wings in a test rig and it only broke after it had bent 24 feet!

This goes to show that the structure of the plane is incredibly strong. That’s why the body of the Boeing 777 that crashed at the London Heathrow airport in 2008 was reasonably intact after it had touched down short of the runway even with the landing gears totally collapsed.

In the recent development of the Boeing 787 (the debute was last week), the launching of this latest plane was delayed for two years because of structural integrity. So, as you can see, the airline industry ensures that the planes must be structurally very sound before you could get to fly in them.

Generally, turbulence is categorized into ‘Light’, ‘Moderate’ and ‘Severe’.

Light Turbulence: With this, occupants in a plane may feel a slight strain against the seat belts or shoulder straps. Unsecured objects may be displaced slightly. Food service may be conducted and little or no difficulty is encountered in walking.

Moderate Turbulence: Here, the passengers may feel some definite strains against seat belts or shoulder straps. Unsecured objects are dislodged. Food service and walking are difficult.

Severe Turbulence: For this category, occupants are forced violently against seat belts or shoulder straps. Unsecured objects are tossed about. Food service and walking are impossible.

The Boeing 777 Wing Load Test


Boeing 777 Wing Loading Test

As for the Airbus A380, you can see the video below. It is in German.

Airbus A380 Wing-Fuselage Testing in Germany


Airbus A380 Wing-Fuselage Testing in Germany

Basically, what they are doing is to simulate extreme weather conditions using hydraulic presses. The test was carried out in Dresden, Germany over a one year period. They were simulating the equivalent of 25 years of flying or 47,500 flights. It was the most extensive testing ever done on a commercial airliner beside the Boeing 777 test above.

Trackback(0)

TrackBack URI for this entry

Comments (0)

Subscribe to this comment's feed

Write comment

smaller | bigger

busy
 

Paperback Version

 For Local Availability - Check Here

Recommended By..


LIFE IN THE SKIES

'A Local Bestseller!'

Recommended by

Patrick Smith
Boston USA
(See
here)

Capt Meryl Getline
ex-United Airlines USA
(See
here)

Capt Doug Morris
Canadian Airlines
(See
here)

Capt  Robert J Boser
ex-United Airlines USA
(See
here)

38 Readers' Comments
(See here)

Get an autographed copy here

AMAZON.COM  -  To Order, please Click here 

(eBook) Kindle edition - please Click here

View Book Launch video here

Follow me

@CaptKHLim

Like What You Read?


If you like what you read, more stories are found in my book LIFE IN THE SKIES (Preview here) and you can purchase a copy here. To check for any latest updates or postings, you can follow my Twitter at @CaptKHLim or Facebook here

MH 370 Interviews

Click here to View

10 Most Popular Posts



Disclaimer | Privacy
2004 - 2011 © AskCaptainLim.com | Site Concept by eQuilec.com